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Please Note: Efforts are being made to update this website and provide information about the Voorhees Group’s current research activities. Information regarding current and former group members is correct as of 6/9/2017 and updates on current projects should be completed within the next month.

The Voorhees Research Group does a wide variety of experimental, computational and theoretical materials related research; we currently have ongoing research projects on solidification and coarsening dynamics of materials, phase field crystal methods, CALPHAD modeling, and corrosion.

The experimental portions of these research projects utilizes the groups experience in 3D characterization, including automated serial-sectioning and x-ray tomography. Coarsening experiments on liquid-solid mixtures are done in a microgravity environment on the International Space Station and land based coarsening experiments are done using synchrotron radiation to make time-resolved, in-situ observations of the coarsening dynamics of these systems. A highlight of the work done at APS can be seen here: Now Showing in 3-D: The Growth of Metallic Dendrites

Computational research within the group has consisted of phase field simulations to model grain growth in multi-phase solid systems, nano wire growth and diffusion pathways in fuel cells. The group is also involved in the development of the phase field crystal method for modeling materials at atomistic length scales and diffusional time scales. This research is performed on Northwestern’s high performance computing system, Quest.

Theoretical research in the group involves the development of thermodynamic and kinetic models of various materials phenomena. This work includes the development of theories for coarsening of precipitate phases, CALPHAD modeling, and analyzing the development of morphological instabilities during material processing.

Information about past projects can be found here.